The Detroit Post
Thursday, 28 October, 2021

Do Weather Spotters Get Paid

author
Ellen Grant
• Tuesday, 29 December, 2020
• 11 min read

Typically, storm spotters are volunteer fire departments, law enforcement, and amateur radio operators because they are often mobile and have very efficient modes of communication. Individual spotters can still participate by passing their information along to their main county contact or the Gaylord News directly.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Contents

To do this, we study the environment leading up to a severe weather event in great detail and monitor technologically advanced Doppler Radar data. By adding in real-time reports from what the storm is actually doing makes our warnings that much more accurate, credible, and timely.

We also use spotter reports to help verify if severe weather is or did occur during the official warning. These are typically held in the early spring (March or April) and provide you with the basics and contact information you'll need to get started.

You may also want to contact your county Emergency Management director to find out how you can get involved locally. The National Weather Service provides training for groups (usually countywide) free of charge.

You may want to bring a pen, pencil, and paper to take notes. Because of the complexity of severe thunderstorms and the potential dangers involved, spotting is recommended for ages 18 and older.

Middle and high school students are welcome to attend the classes with a parent or other adult. The Gaylord News office usually conducts training during March and April.

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(Source: heathcaldwell.com)

With most training scheduled in March or April, winter storms are possible and have caused us to cancel and reschedule in the past. An interactive multimedia presentation is given by a meteorologist, including various images and video loops from past storms in Michigan and the Great Lakes area.

A spotter can help out their community by being the “eyes” of the National Weather Service. The Gaylord News office does not assign spotter IDs, numbers, or distribute certificates.

Contact your county Emergency Management director for any local policies. Usually the training class is scheduled and organized by the county Emergency Management director.

If you would like to organize a class, check with your county Emergency Management director first. For specifics in your area, be sure to contact your county Emergency Management director.

Spotter groups may need to travel a small distance in order to make a nearby session. Since the News often travels several hours to give training, we expect spotter groups to drive the 15 miles or fewer it takes to make most nearby talks.

Often times the News will coordinate spotter training sessions with county Emergency Management directors. Spotters typically monitor storms in their local area and report real-time conditions back to the National Weather Service.

The Gaylord News office conducts training that covers basic to advanced material in one session. There is a lot of information via the Internet about severe weather (see links below).

The Gaylord News recommends spotters attend a training session at least every 3 years. Some new information or spotting ideas are presented each year to keep the training as fresh as possible.

Severe weather safety is a common presentation we give to groups, but we can modify a program to fit your needs. Contact the office Warning Coordination Meteorologist for other details.

Tornadoes and hurricanes being the worst of the natural disasters hold the ability to destroy buildings, houses, crops and whatever comes their way. People who live in areas where such natural phenomenon repeatedly occur keep a close check on weather, and they evacuate their houses and buildings when any of these natural calamities are predictable.

Storm chasers, on the other hand, keep an even closer check on the weather reports for a different purpose. But if all of your knowledge’s origin is social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and reality TV shows, then you have the wrong idea about becoming a storm chaser.

Here are some steps that you can follow if you are a beginner and want to pursue storm chasing as a career. There are a lot of famous companies that charge you a few thousand dollars and take you on trips for ten days to a fortnight.

You travel thousands of miles in pursuit of tornadoes and severe storms. And they avoid taking pictures of loss of people because it’s against the work ethic, and also, it shows that you have a disrespectful behavior.

Radars sure do tell about where the next storm is going to be, but if you yourself have the knowledge of reading the weather, then you are good to go. Skyward is a program by National Weather Service that gives you the basic knowledge about meteorology and storm spotting.

You can also volunteer with Skyward and travel with them for thousands of kilometers gaining you tons of experience. Nonetheless, it’s better to monitor the weather conditions in your area, because you can always seek shelter.

If you think you have done ugh storm spotting and you are ready to set on an expedition, then you need to get under a mentor first. Because there are still things like safety procedures when tackling storms, lightning, hail, tornadoes, and floods.

Tackling severe weather conditions, Safety procedures in case of injuries, Storm spotting, Having better hunches, and Being there before the calamity even hits Because you do not want all your efforts to go in vain if you can't get good footage of the storm you have been chasing.

Storm Chasing is not something that you only do for having fun, or meeting new people and making friends. Many people who start storm chasing as an adventure get so into it that they adopt it as their career and pursue it as their means of earning.

The answer to these questions are the actual figures that people are getting as their salary or their rate, or what they charge per expedition. People who are new to storm chasing and who are doing it for fun would pay you a great deal of money to bring you with them.

An estimate tells you that a single person would pay you $3500 to bring them along on your expeditions. You are expected to earn $70,000 yearly, but then again, you have to travel thousands of kilometers on your own expense.

Storm chasing is new to people as a profession so it should not be so hard making your name in this trade if you try your best. Once you make your name in this trade, people would not only recognize you, but they will even kill to have your footage and pictures.

Each of his photos is sold in 5 figures and people not only admire his work, but they acknowledge him as the best in the business. He received fame from the Discovery Channel's show “Storm Chaser,” and he was awarded approximately $250,000.

So, if you can somehow make your name in this field for your hard work and dedication, then not only you can earn well, but you can be an international sensation. Otherwise, people wouldn’t be able to stick to the same job for years, and in some cases, even a lifetime.

The thrill, the excitement, and the adventurous feel that you have while chasing a storm, that’s worth all the troubles and hardships. While some people just go on these expeditions to do something new and to kill the boredom, there are scientists and researchers out there who go on these storm chasing trips to study the weather.

Skyward Spotter Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Here is a list of frequently asked questions about the Skyward program or severe storm spotting for the La Crosse News office. Main News La Crosse contact for spotter training is Todd Shea, Warning Coordination Meteorologist.

Typically, storm spotters are volunteer fire departments, law enforcement, and amateur radio operators because they are often mobile and have very efficient modes of communication. Individual spotters can still participate by passing their information along to their main county contact or the La Crosse News directly.

To do this, we study the environment leading up to a severe weather event in great detail and monitor technologically advanced Doppler Radar data. By adding in real-time reports from what the storm is actually doing makes our warnings that much more accurate, credible, and timely.

We also use spotter reports to help verify if severe weather is or did occur during the official warning. There are roughly 1500 storm spotters in our County Warning Area.

The first step is to attend a spotter training class in your area. These are typically held in the early spring (March or April) and provide you with the basics and contact information you'll need to get started.

You may also want to contact your county Emergency Management director to find out how you can get involved locally. The National Weather Service provides training for groups (usually countywide) free of charge.

Typically, not, but if you want to take notes, bring a pen, pencil, and paper. Because of the complexity of severe thunderstorms and the potential dangers involved, spotting is recommended for adults (18 yrs or older).

With most training scheduled in March or April, winter storms are possible and have caused us to cancel and reschedule in the past. Press releases for individual training sessions are also sent to area newspapers, television, and radio stations.

An interactive multimedia presentation is given by a meteorologist, including various images and video loops from past storms in Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin. A spotter can help out their community by being the “eyes” of the National Weather Service.

The La Crosse News office does not assign spotter IDs, numbers, or distribute certificates. Contact your county Emergency Management director for any local policies.

Usually the county (911/dispatch, Sheriff Dept., Emergency Management director) deploys their spotter networks. The National Weather Service may request spotters to deploy in a particular area but it is up to the individual group to decide when to go out.

Spotters should be deployed anytime thunderstorms threaten their community. Spotter networks need to be proactive and position themselves before storms move in.

Usually the training class is scheduled and organized by the county Emergency Management director. If you would like to organize a class, check with your county Emergency Management director first.

For specifics in your area, be sure to contact your county Emergency Management director. Spotter groups may need to travel a small distance in order to make a nearby session.

Since the News often travels several hours to give training, we expect spotter groups to drive the 15 miles or fewer it takes to make most nearby talks. Often times the News will coordinate spotter training sessions with county Emergency Management directors.

Other workload issues concerning Homeland Security may also force training to be skipped. Spotters typically monitor storms in their local area and report real-time conditions back to the National Weather Service.

At the current time, the La Crosse News office conducts training that covers basic to advanced material in one session. Occasionally a class that covers additional storm observation tools is presented.

There is a lot of information via the Internet about severe weather (see links below). Consider taking a class on meteorology at a local college or university.

The La Crosse News recommends spotters attend a training session at least every other year. Some new information or spotting ideas are presented each year to keep the training as fresh as possible.

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Sources
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