The Detroit Post
Sunday, 28 November, 2021

Do Weather Loaches Fart

author
David Lawrence
• Saturday, 17 October, 2020
• 13 min read

I normally don't see my weather coach and his farting antics. But I happened to turn my head to the tanks direction and saw a stream of bubbles comes from the bottom to the top, like there was a bubble wand was in there.

Contents

Just the thought of fish and farting doesn't go together properly in my mind. My Grams constantly let air out their mouths but never their rears.

Game Robson Posts: 9096 Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 9:34 am Location: Peterborough, UK Post by Game Robson Fri Apr 06, 2007 12:24 pm He probably absorbs oxygen from the air through his guts and released it in their normal fashion.

Game Robson Posts: 9096 Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 9:34 am Location: Peterborough, UK Post by Game Robson Fri Apr 06, 2007 12:49 pm I'd call the cloud a Spring cleaning of the hind gut.

These intriguing eel-shaped coaches, which are members of the family Cobitidae, find sanctuary in the silt or mud-rich substrates, meandering through leaf litter and resting with heads protruding from often dense cover. It should also be as wide as possible, so the fish have a large footprint to explore, and be well covered to prevent these expert jumpers escaping.

If you must have gravel buy a very fine smooth grade, as anything sharp could easily damage their 'scale-less' skin and those delicate barbels. As with all coaches, good filtration and a frequent partial water change regime will be key to your fish’s well-being.

Plants tolerant of temperate conditions can be grown in the Weather coach aquarium, but these fish tend to mischievously dig and uproot them. Provide your Weatherloaches with several hiding places, as although they can be very active they tend to rest for the best part of the day and come to life in the evening and during the night.

They can be safely kept with most temperate community fishes, but avoid species which could be spooked by a coach’s sudden, unpredictable darts around the aquarium. ), Rosy barbs (Pundits conchies), Red phantom tetras (Hyphessobrycon swellest), Argentine blood fins (Aphyocharax visits) and many subtropical Avionics.

A small and often indistinct dark blotch is present on the upper end of the body at the junction with the caudal fin. Weatherloaches have evolved to live in many ‘temporary’ locations, such as ponds, streams, and man-made rice fields where water often becomes stagnant and therefore low in oxygen.

Many fish keepers, particularly in countries with more volatile weather, maintain that as pressure drops the coaches become restless, frantically swimming around, sometimes jumping and splashing. Aquarium spawning are said to occur when mature pairs have been conditioned with live or frozen foods, subjected to higher than normal temperature and then given frequent cooler water changes.

While the act of spawning went unseen, eagle-eyed staff spotted the tiniest movement in the gravel in a sump tank and a thorough search revealed three fry. Weatherloaches have also been released in Italy, the Philippines, parts of the USA, including Hawaii, and Germany where breeding populations are well established.

This species is not considered a threat to UK water systems because temperatures drop too low during winter, hence they are still available in our shops. However, a similar species, Misguides fossils, was banned from the UK several years ago as an accidental release was considered a threat because it can tolerate the lower temperatures of our waters.

Written by Charlie Sharpe In the United States, we watch the weather report in the evening news. Amazingly, our weather experts might be given a run for their money when pitted against the meteorologically gifted fish.

When storms approach the previously calm weather coach begins swimming wildly about, appearing to be looking for a way out. Their active and interesting personalities coupled with ease of care have made them one of the most popular coaches.

This ever-widening distribution is due to several factors, including aquarium releases and farms where the fish are raised as a food source and for use as angling bait. Often mistaken for an eel, the weather coach has an elongated olive-colored body that is either striped from head to tail (as seen in Misguides fossils, rarely seen in the United States and Western Europe), or sprinkled with many spots, as seen in Misguides angullicaudatusis.

Many owners can relate stories of their coach jumping from the tank and surviving overnight without any ill effects. It is not unusual to see a weather coach resting on its pectoral fins as if they were arms, intently following your movements with its eyes.

Some owners report that their weather coach likes to be touched and even petted. The ability of the weather coach to thrive in less than optimal situations dates back to its natural habitat in China and Japan.

The weather coach enjoys hiding places such as rocks and other landscaping materials, or even something as simple as a plastic tube left in the tank. Lighting should be subdued, or plenty of covers provided so shady hiding spots can be found.

In the wild, their diet consists of insect larvae, small crustaceans and mollusks, and detritus.However, they will also readily eat fresh vegetables. Their ability to adapt their diet has made them a subject of some concern because of the impact they could have on the aquatic insect population should the numbers of weatherloaches in the wild increase.

Breeding is fairly difficult, primarily due to a lack of knowledge about their spawning habits. Spawning occurs in the spring to early summer, before water temperatures become too warm.

I know that they're carnivorous, they do well in cold water, they're friendly and apparently like to be pet, they like to burrow in SOFT substrate, they're escape artists, they're good candidates for a community tank, they can survive outside of water for several hours, they get to be approx 6-8 inches long, they seldom breed in captivity, and they're extremely responsive to barometric changes. They like colder water 68-78 degrees, I have mine with my goldfish and they LOVE sand or something to bury in.

They will also (probably) murder most plants because mine won't stop digging. They're friendly, mine have started taking pellets from my hand.

They can just, Diego has decided he is like getting airborne so have a lid and I keep the water about 2 inches below the lid and I'm probably going to leave an even bigger gap in my new tank because the goldfish likes to play Free Will. They can survive out of water, my first one lasted two, unfortunately, three hours was too long for him when he tried making the jump again, but he *was* still alive when I found him... all three of my current ones are right around the 7-8 inch range, my two females are much thicker than my male.

Dojo, or weather coaches, as I know them, are probably the coolest fish I have ever owned.ok from what I've experience with my three bundles of joy. They like colder water 68-78 degrees, I have mine with my goldfish and they LOVE sand or something to bury in.

They will also (probably) murder most plants because mine won't stop digging. They're friendly, mine have started taking pellets from my hand.

They can just, Diego has decided he is like getting airborne so have a lid and I keep the water about 2 inches below the lid and I'm probably going to leave an even bigger gap in my new tank because the goldfish likes to play Free Will. They can survive out of water, my first one lasted two, unfortunately, three hours was too long for him when he tried making the jump again, but he *was* still alive when I found him... all three of my current ones are right around the 7-8 inch range, my two females are much thicker than my male.

They like frozen brine shrimp and mine love Hikaru bottom feeder wafer. Be careful though, feeding them any amount of freeze-dried food.

They will swim up to the surface to fill air on occasion, it is believed that this is to aid in.pushing the food farther along their digestive tract. If you see them with their rear floating, and their front on the floor of the aquarium, then they are going to fart.

Watch them long enough, and you will see bubbles float from their butts AS they fart. Avoid all meds if you can, constipation can be cured by holding off on feed mg ordering shelled peas.

I've been lucky... yes, groups, yes cuddling, they've adopted my rope fish into the gang and yes they fart. They like frozen brine shrimp and mine love Hikaru bottom feeder wafer.

Be careful though, feeding them any amount of freeze-dried food. Because of their long narrow shape, they easily become constipated. They will swim up to the surface to fill air on occasion, it is believed that this is to aid in.pushing the food farther along their digestive tract.

If you see them with their rear floating, and their front on the floor of the aquarium, then they are going to fart. Watch them long enough, and you will see bubbles float from their butts AS they fart.

They'll east pellet, flakes, blood worms, I've heard zucchini but haven't tried it yet. I don't have any yet, but I will post after I have the new tank completely cycled and my are ready to noodles come home.

And you can feed them a freeze-dried treat, just very sparingly and watch for the floating. If they start floating, that means they are constipated, feed them the shelled peas.

They appear to be alright (fingers crossed) with rich, and have tolerated a week-long journey into 80 degrees F while I battled ICH. I think they are safer with higher temperatures as long as it isn't for any extended period of time, rather than the meds.

They like about 60 – 70 % meat, 30-40% algae, veggie, shelled peas. They like to cruise along the tank, and will occasionally run into the glass.

And you can feed them a freeze-dried treat, just very sparingly and watch for the floating. If they start floating, that means they are constipated, feed them the shelled peas.

They appear to be alright (fingers crossed) with rich, and have tolerated a week-long journey into 80 degrees F while I battled ICH. I think they are safer with higher temperatures as long as it isn't for any extended period of time, rather than the meds.

They like about 60 – 70 % meat, 30-40% algae, veggie, shelled peas. They like to cruise along the tank, and will occasionally run into the glass. I have 5 happy little noodles.

I have a canister filter, so I just tired really coarse mesh over the outtake so that nothing swims in it. It's a hard current but my rope fish got his big head stuck in it.

Haha, Refugio it's part of my sump that I soak alder cones and oak leaves in or grow moss/plants etc. I didn't want to put him directly in the aquarium for fear of inhabitants dining on his mummified body.

Whenever I go to feed them tube blocks I have to battle him to get it stuck on the glass, and he sounds like a grown man slurping soup when he begs at the surface for food Haha, Refugio it's part of my sump that I soak alder cones and oak leaves in or grow moss/plants etc.

Good grief I knew it wasn't that but had no idea what in Sam hill you were taking about. I am thinking shrimp pellets, bottom feeder pellets, spirulina wafers, vegetables, brine shrimp, blood worms, tube worms (frozen or freeze-dried) and algae wafers. I figure with this diet plus the occasional live shrimp they will be quite the spoiled little piggies.

I have a canister filter, so I just tired really coarse mesh over the outtake so that nothing swims in it. It's a hard current but my rope fish got his big head stuck in it.

As soon as he started thrashing (and scared the ever loving you-know-what out of me and the cat) he got his head out. I feed my dojos frozen blood worms, frozen Mafia, freeze-dried tube, boiled egg, seaweed, boiled vegetables, algae wafers, homemade food, flakes and pellets.

I give my oldies homemade gel food using unflavored Knox gelatin with blended chicken, seafood medley containing shrimp, scallops, and mussels, whole hard-boiled eggs (yolks have LOTS of iron), bell peppers, broccoli, peas, VERY small amount of paprika, VERY small amount of garlic as I hear it is good for their immune system, lettuce, corn, and asparagus. I started doing this after they began to reject Rep ashy Solvent Green. They love the food I made them and I supplement thawed peas, brine shrimp, and blood worms alongside every day.

As soon as he started thrashing (and scared the ever loving you-know-what out of me and the cat) he got his head out. I am thinking shrimp pellets, bottom feeder pellets, spirulina wafers, vegetables, brine shrimp, blood worms, tube worms (frozen or freeze-dried) and algae wafers. I figure with this diet plus the occasional live shrimp they will be quite the spoiled little piggies.

I feel my coaches will look more like bloated bananas than little noodles when I'm through spoiling them lol I give my oldies homemade gel food using unflavored Knox gelatin with blended chicken, seafood medley containing shrimp, scallops, and mussels, whole hard-boiled eggs (yolks have LOTS of iron), bell peppers, broccoli, peas, VERY small amount of paprika, VERY small amount of garlic as I hear it is good for their immune system, lettuce, corn, and asparagus. I started doing this after they began to reject Rep ashy Solvent Green.

They love the food I made them and I supplement thawed peas,, and blood worms alongside every day. If either mush all the ingredients up then bake them in cupcake cases or make a gel food.

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Sources
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5 www.zillow.com - https://www.zillow.com/profile/Nancy-B-Meeks/