The Detroit Post
Friday, 26 February, 2021

Do Weather Cracked Tires Pass Safety

author
Danielle Fletcher
• Wednesday, 28 October, 2020
• 8 min read

All tires develop tread and sidewall cracking over time. Tires that sit idle for months at a time on vehicles like trailers, motor homes, classic cars, collector, performance cars, grandma’s, and the church van.

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(Because just like me lol , your tires may look good and be holding air just fine now but put them under load on a 105-degree day and you’re inviting trouble!) You can't reverse tire-cracking but can slow it down by cleaning and protecting your tire's rubber.

We use and recommend Dark Fury wheel cleaner, mixed 3:1 to clean all the brake dust and grime. Dark Fury gets the stubborn brake dust off your wheels and when used on tires, removes the excess antioxidant, which can make your tires turn brown.

You'll find independent advice, good tires, quality service, and a comfortable place to wait. We're the people and support you need to make your new tires a good investment.

Lots of fine tire sidewall cracks can be caused by exposure to sunlight, excessive heat, or ozone. Many people associate ozone with the atmosphere, but the gas can also be produced by static electricity from machines.

Incorrect tire inflation such as frequent low pressure can lead to cracked tires. Tires are created with rubber compounds that contain antidegradants such as waxes, antioxidants, or antioxidants.

These help protect against ozone, oxygen, heat, and other causes of degradation that can lead to your tires cracking. These protectants don't work as well when the tires remain stationary for long periods of time.

Taking a few extra strolls around town in a car you don't usually drive can help maintain its tires. Cleaners that are too harsh can actually strip away the protective compounds that are designed to help prevent tire cracking.

This is rare these days, but you should visit your local dealership, so they can inspect your tires for you. As the structural integrity of the tire worsens, the risk of a blowout increases.

And a tire blowout at highway speeds would create an immediate emergency situation. I also recently bought some used (never on ground spare) tires for off-roading that I found to have some seemingly minor weather checking. I recently discovered that the manufacturers state that tires should be discarded after 6 years from the date of manufacture regardless of their apparent condition.

I figure that if I am going to go off-roading with my PJ I would rather do it with cheap tires that I can more readily afford to replace if I accidentally tear one up. The tires I've torn up in the past were almost new and it was the sidewalls that failed due to rocks etc.

I would think that blow outs would more logically come from tires that were damaged on the trails but low pressure prevented failure until run at high speed (higher temperatures) and normal higher pressure on the freeways going home. Give the tires a thorough check for Dry Rot.....

Or go by a local tire place (that you trust.)I mean, only be skeptical of them if they tell you what you don't want to hear. Give the tires a thorough check for Dry Rot.....

I got so tired of tire stores telling me that I needed new ball joints when there was nothing wrong with my ball joints that I quit going to tire stores years ago (and Goodyear lost a very good customer). Next Michelin lost me as a good customer when they refused to honor a promotion on tires I bought from Sam's club and I had to get the Attorney General to get Sam's Club to honor their promotion.

Tread depth is also a safety issue and therefore subject to government regulation and inspection. A tire’s tread helps it to maintain traction with the road, especially in wet or icy conditions.

The specific pattern of the tread determines the conditions for which the tire is best suited. The rubber on the tire’s driving surface wears off with use, which reduces tread depth over time.

Snow tires wear out more quickly because they’re made of a softer rubber that makes greater contact with the road. Understanding the specific type of tires on your truck will ensure you’re able to properly care for them throughout the year.

Tires are generally unsuitable for snow and rain when their tread depth is less than 3/16 inch, due to the greater traction these conditions require. A deeper tread is needed in snow to maintain maneuverability and control.

Wet surfaces also require a greater tread depth to avoid hydroplaning, a condition that prevents tires from getting any traction all. Tires shouldn’t be used under any conditions once the tread depth reaches 1/16 inch and should be replaced immediately.

Most states also require tires to have a tread depth of at least 1/16 inch before they can pass inspection. The tires on all vehicles generally must be inspected by the state once per year, although commercial trucks have more stringent requirements.

Tire manufacturing in the United States is regulated by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FM VSS). A tire that shows this discoloration should be replaced before the next inspection, since it probably won’t pass.

Tread gauges are typically accurate to the nearest 1/32 inch, and modern versions have a digital display to eliminate human error from the measurement. The sidewall of a tire supports the weight of the vehicle and helps absorb shock from bumps in the road, according to Rightful.

The sidewall is layered with sturdy rubber in order to hold its form and keep air inside the tire.” (www.rightturn.com) Schedule an appointment with a truck dealership or certified auto mechanic to rotate your tires.

Vehicle owners traditionally used a penny, or a quarter, to estimate tread depth, although this method is less common today. This will help you detect whether there are any strange wear patterns throughout the tire, which may be the result of a mechanical issue.

Weather conditions such as heat, cold and sunlight cause cracks to appear on the sidewalls and at the base of tire's tread grooves. Tire cracking is a problem more for stored vehicles such as RVs, classic cars and trailers.

While you cannot prevent minor cracks, you can take steps to protect your tires from major damage. Avoid using alcohol and petroleum-based cleaners as the rubber surface gets dry and cracks easier.

If you wash them with harsh chemicals, you will remove the protective layer allowing the tires to prematurely deteriorate. If you must leave it outside during the cold months, place something under the tires to prevent them from freezing to the ground.

Ultraviolet rays cause a lot of damage to sidewalls, including deep cracking. Step 5 Unload your RV before storing it to avoid any additional weight on the tires.

Still has loads of tread left because the bike only has 5000 km on it but I always heard cracking tires was a sign of dry rot and should be replaced. Anyway, it passed the safety with this cracked tire on it. I'm not worried I'm going to die or anything if I ride on it like that but I just presumed it would fail.

Only the most banal ideas can successfully cross great distances at the speed of light. http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/html/regs/english/elaws_regs_900611_e.htm#BK11 Of course, I do not recommend riding on dried out, old tires.

I worked as a Tech at a GM Dealer for 15 years and never really liked doing Certs as there are too many gray areas according to the MTO. My personal policy on certs was that if I didn't like the looks of it I wouldn't sign the cert. After all it is my license on the line. In some cases my service manager would sign it when I wouldn't. Most times he agreed with me though. I would never sign a cert on something that had cracked tires (especially a bike). I agree with your personal policy, however, it is not what the ministry recommends and technically you should've passed those vehicles.

I also think that safety regulations are extremely outdated and it is unfair to put mechanics on the spot. I agree with your personal policy, however, it is not what the ministry recommends and technically you should've passed those vehicles.

I also think that safety regulations are extremely outdated and it is unfair to put mechanics on the spot. Like I said “Too many gray areas and it's my license/livelihood”. Sometimes you have to go with common sense although there doesn't seem to be a lot of that these days. I think MOST people would realize that I would be doing them a service by not passing unsafe tires.

Like I said “Too many gray areas and it's my license/livelihood”. Sometimes you have to go with common sense although there doesn't seem to be a lot of that these days. I think MOST people would realize that I would be doing them a service by not passing unsafe tires. Most people think a safety meaning the car/bike/truck is 100%.There are allowable limits of play in the steering system.

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Sources
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4 www.realtor.com - https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Glendale_CA/pg-5