The Detroit Post
Sunday, 07 March, 2021

Do Amazon Spray Their Boxes With Pesticides

author
James Lee
• Tuesday, 17 November, 2020
• 7 min read

In the United States, pesticides and pesticide devices must comply with the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (“FIFA”) and applicable state and local laws, including registration and labeling requirements. Unregistered pesticides (for example, insecticide chalk, tree pastor) Pesticide products and pesticide devices sold by non-U.S. residents Pesticide products not intended for sale in the U.S. (these may look like recognized brands, but they do not have an EPA registration or establishment number) Pesticide devices that were manufactured in a location or facility other than an EPA-registered establishment, that lack a clearly visible EPA establishment number on the label, or that make false or misleading claims Restricted use pesticides, which are not to be available for purchase or use by the public Products labeled for professional use only Products labeled for use by individuals/firms licensed or registered by the state to apply germicide products not registered with the EPA and all applicable state and local laws that make a pesticide claim, including those that may be subject to specific state registration requirements, unless subject to one of the limited exclusions below Pesticide products that make false or misleading claims or are otherwise disbanded (for example, claims regarding the safety of the pesticide or its ingredients, such as “safe”, “non-poisonous”, “non-injurious”, “harmless”, “non-toxic”, or “all natural”) Pesticide products that make public health claims (for example, products marketed to control or mitigate any disease, infection, or pathological condition) Mosquito repellent bracelets and stickers that are not approved brands per Amazon policy.

Contents

In Seller Central, select Inventory and click Add a Product. In the search results, click the Listing limitations apply link across from the ASIN.

Once redirected to Seller University, complete the training with an 80% or higher score. Once redirected to the application workflow, check the box to agree to the Guaranty and click Submit.

Note: Sellers are required to complete this course prior to listing pesticides on Amazon. Angela Lang/CNET For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there is very low risk for the coronavirus to spread from packages that have traveled over a period of days. The most consistent advice we've seen is to wash your hands for at least 20 seconds after handling packages and their contents.

Tyler Likely/CNET Inside a gigantic supply chain warehouse a stone's throw from Louisville International Airport, UPS set up a showroom filled with long, shiny packaging machines that spit out fast-expanding foam or inflated plastic sheets into Bubble Wrap. All the machines were built by Sealed Air, the inventor of Bubble Wrap, which partnered with UPS in creating the space.

That means this logjam may worsen and slow shipping times, so good luck getting that Harry Potter limited-edition action figure with same-day delivery. In one demonstration Monday, a Sealed Air worker showed off a new machine that wrapped shoe boxes in a new material called “StealthWrap,” an ultra-durable film made up of 29 super thin layers.

In another demo, a long, glass-encased machine stuffed with metal pieces and piping was able to create different-size boxes depending on the stuff inside. Some other machines helped make the packaging prettier, giving customers more of that store-display feeling while still shopping at home.

Down the line, Chris man suggested, boxes and Bubble Wrap could have customizable ads or coupons included to make them more than trash once they arrive at your home. My product was/is an air filter under the FBA program.

Amazon recently stopped allowing them to be sold because it allegedly is a “pesticide product”. Every single component of this filter is available in many other air filtration products for sale on Amazon.

After a couple of weeks of at least a dozen communications with increasingly Byzantine-to-down-right-Kafkaesque back and forth with seller support absolutely zero explanation was offered. I provided a list of every single component of the product, with the notable absence of pesticides.

They would not answer the question and reiterate that it can’t be sold because it is a pesticide product. So I finally figured out I should look up just what Amazon means by “Pesticide product.” I got a clue.

In the United States, a broad range of products are subject to regulation as pesticides, including products that you may not immediately think of as pesticides. Any product or device either: (1) intended for preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating any pest, or (2) making any antimicrobial, antifungal, antibacterial, or pesticide claim (each, a “Pesticide”) must comply with the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (“FIFA”), including (in most cases) registration with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”).

My listing contains the wording “Greatly reduces allergens, bacteria, viruses and pet dander in your air.” All true. We just love to kill and trap the heck out of some bad microbes and bacteria and viruses using tried and true technology.

Anything that claims to eliminate bacteria, fungi, or viruses is making an antimicrobial claim according to the EPA and requires a registration, which is a ridiculous amount of work. There’s a device exemption that applies to many mechanical means for controlling pests (think mousetraps), but those don’t apply to the antimicrobial devices.

Certain high frequency sound generators, carbide cannons, foils, and rotating devices for which claims are made to repel birds; You’re lucky you haven’t been busted by the EPA, because that is not a pretty situation.

Since we can’t post links here, Google this: US EPA Levies $82,400 Fine Against Nanosievert Consumer Product That’s an air filter company (Kinetic Solutions) who made antimicrobial claims and got dinged.

I spent the bulk of my 20-year career in the chemical industry in areas that are regulated by FIFA (AG chemicals and antimicrobial), and it’s nice to be able to help folks here with that knowledge. Amazon legal must’ve gotten a whiff of this as a liability concern, because this has come up a few times recently.

I know it was frustrating for me, because I worked for a big company that did everything by the book while small competitors came in and skirted the rules. Perhaps for physical filters (HEPA), the process might not be so arduous, but it’s still likely to involve a bunch of GLP testing.

Hi, I’m the seller of air purifier, my product was also identified as “Pesticide”, I have tried to contact them and explaining that my product was not pesticide, but they always replied the same answer. That is considered an antimicrobial claim that requires EPA registration.

My understanding is that this phrase, in and of itself, isn’t necessarily making a pesticidal claim (though some argue it does). What are your thoughts on using “get around” language such as: “While we make no claims, due to FDA regulations that that our product does in fact perform this function, catching is a proven antibacterial, antiviral and antimicrobial agent used in many air filters including industry giants like Mitsubishi.”.

If you want to make a treated article claim (that the product is protected from microbial degradation), then it must contain an EPA-registered pesticide. In fact, if you’re adding an ingredient with the intent for it to kill microorganisms or act as a preservative, that ingredient must be an EPA registered pesticide according to FIFA.

But I just got to wonder why you couldn’t more or less argue on First Amendment basis why you wouldn’t be able to say that this or that ingredient is known in certain applications to produce certain antimicrobial/antibacterial/antifungal outcomes. Kind of like how non-FDA approved food supplements make very carefully worded claims and/or guide you to other information not from them about their ingredients to avoid the allegation that it is them who are making the claim.

Purrified_Air: But I just got to wonder why you couldn’t more or less argue on First Amendment basis why you wouldn’t be able to say that this or that ingredient is known in certain applications to produce certain antimicrobial/antibacterial/antifungal outcomes. I doubt you would want to live in a country without environmental protection rules and regulations.

I vowed to (and did) remove language that claimed my air filter had antimicrobial properties. Apparently you have to use just the right words and the humans (barely) that finally get to it after the bots have to be led by the nose.

In the United States, a broad range of products are subject to regulation as pesticides, including products that you may not immediately think of as pesticides. Any product or device either: (1) intended for preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating any pest, or (2) making any antimicrobial, antifungal, antibacterial, or pesticide claim (each, a “Pesticide”) must comply with the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (“FIFA”), including (in most cases) registration with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”).

And many, many others in the air filter categories also make similar pesticide products claims. I had escalated this case to our internal team and as per the update, I am glad to inform you that the ASIN has been reinstated successfully.

To help us continually improve, we ask that you take a moment to complete our survey below to tell us about your experience with this specific interaction. Anything that says that it kills insects, microbes, or plants is legally regulated in the US.

While the Amazon form letter may say “pesticide”, it really refers to anything regulated by FIFA, the governing law. Per the post I made earlier in this thread, that includes many pest control devices.

Those that are making purely mechanical or electrical claims for pest mitigation are not required to register their products with the EPA. Those devices that contain or dispense a substance to achieve their pesticidal properties are required to register with the EPA under FIFA section 3.

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Sources
1 www.zillow.com - https://www.zillow.com/profile/john%20oliver37
2 john-oliver.cbselectre.com - https://john-oliver.cbselectre.com/
3 www.facebook.com - https://www.facebook.com/NVLuxuryRealtor/
4 www.ngkf.com - http://www.ngkf.com/home/about-our-firm/global-offices/us-offices/long-island/professional-profiles.aspx
5 red.nv.gov - https://red.nv.gov/Content/Real_Estate/Commission/
6 realestate.adn.com - https://realestate.adn.com/